Oreo Day (or The Sieve and the Sandwich Cookie)
Take Back the Kitchen
Take Back the Kitchen
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Ingredients

  • 1908-2001, with a brief comeback in
  • 100 years old, 102 to be exact) as a competitor to Hydrox Cookies, which, sadly, aren’t around anymore due to mergers, rebranding, and Oreo kicking Hydrox’s butt in sales. The last time Hydrox were seen was when they were sold as part of the product’s 100th birthday in 2008. Compared to Oreos, Hydrox’s filling wasn’t overly sweet, it was kosher/halal (Oreo’s original recipe had lard in it, and, as Jewish and Muslim dietary laws will tell you, pork products are verboten, as pigs are seen as dirty, disease-ridden scavengers), and Hydrox’s chocolate wafer could stand its own when being dunked in milk.
  • 25 a pound in 1912 would be $5.86 today when adjusted for inflation, which is how much Oreos are priced in some of the mom-and-pop delis and kwik-e-marts I’ve been to. Okay, maybe not that much, but I’ve seen them go anywhere from $3.50 to $4.99 — minus tax, of course. As for the original packaging, Nabisco probably switched over to the “We Three Sleeves” packaging to keep the prices down and for freshness reasons, though I’ll bet you there’s a farmer’s market out there that has homemade, heart-smart, gluten-free, vegan Oreos in a decorative can (made of recycled materials, because that’s how the fair-food, go-green crowd works) that’s probably somewhere between $1.50 to $2.50 a pound (maybe more).
  • COOKIES
  • 2½ sticks unsalted butter, softened
  • ¼ cup black cocoa powder
  • ¼ cup Dutch-processed cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon instant espresso or instant coffee
  • 1 cup (7 ounces) granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2¼ cups (11¼ ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 4 cups (16 ounces) confectioners’ sugar
  • Pinch salt
  • 2½ tablespoons water
  • In

Instructions

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